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Mummification In Ancient Egypt

Updated: Aug 12, 2019



By The Guiding of (Amon RA) the Sun god the supreme patron of Ancient Egypt ,The ancient Egyptians followed his cycle everyday rising from the east so they have assigned east with life and west where the sunset they assign it with death or the other world , and they connected the west with a lot of mysteries and myths in their religion and the life after death

Ancient Egyptians believed in the life after death and the resurrection of the body and the eternal life.

That’s why they were very keen to preserve their bodies to be ready for the afterlife, moreover get their tombs fully equipped with all their needs for the life after death.

Although mummification was not affordable to everyone in ancient Egypt, but everybody was doing his best to get ready for the resurrection, this explains not all the mummies were found in a good condition.

It’s called a journey to the other world and this journey could be achieved if the body is well preserved through the mummification process and given a properly furnished tomb with everything needed for the life after death.

The practice of mummification began in Egypt in 2400 B.C. and continued into the Graeco-Roman Period. During the Old Kingdom, it was believed that only pharaohs could attain immortality. Around 2000 B.C., attitudes changed, however: everyone could live in the afterworld as long as the body was mummified, and the proper elements were placed in the tomb. But since mummification was expensive, only the wealthy were able to take advantage of it.

Materials Used in Mummification process

Natron, a disinfectant and desiccating agent, was the main ingredient used in the mummification process. A compound of sodium carbonate and sodium bicarbonate (salt and baking soda), natron essentially dried out the corpse. Obtained from dried-up river beds, it was packed around and inside the body in linen bags and left for 35 to 40 days to draw moisture out of the tissues. By removing the organs and packing the internal cavity with dry natron, the body tissues were preserved. The body was filled with Nile mud, sawdust, lichen and cloth scraps to make it more flexible. Small cooking onions or linen pads were sometimes used to replace the eyes. Beginning in the third dynasty, the internal organs (lungs, stomach, liver and intestines) were removed, washed with palm wine and spices, and stored in four separate canopic jars made of limestone, calcite or clay. Prior to this, the abdominal contents were removed, wrapped and buried in the floor of the tomb. However, the heart was left in the body because it was considered the center of intelligence.

The corpse was then washed, wrapped in linen (as many as 35 layers) and soaked in resins and oils. This gave the skin a blackened appearance resembling pitch. The corpse was then washed, wrapped in linen (as many as 35 layers) and soaked in resins and oils. This gave the skin a blackened appearance resembling pitch. The term "mummification" comes from the Arabic word mummia, which mean bitumen, a pitch substance that was first used in the preservation process during the Late Period. The family of the deceased supplied the burial linen, which was made from old bed sheets or used clothing.

The mummification process artifact went through many stages of development until the Greco roman period, until it became to an end also the mummification business in ancient Egypt

External Links

www.historymuseum.ca


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